Overview

Diagnosis of prostate cancer has come a long way since the old days, since everyone had to have a finger test to diagnosis it.  These days if you have an elevated PSA or you have a strong family history of prostate cancer you can choose to have an MRI scan of your prostate gland instead. This scan will show us if there is a concerning lesion inside your prostate, and if there is, we can help the surgeon target that lesion in order to accurately diagnose your disease.

If you do get diagnosed with prostate cancer, we have another form of scan called PSMA PET-CT scan which aims to make sure that the cancer hasn't spread outside of the prostate gland.

For patients with advanced prostate cancer, we also offer a form of palliative treatment called Lutetium PSMA which we safely administer at our facility

At Mercy Radiology, we see you clearly by offering the full range of diagnostic imaging and treatment services to make sure that you get the best outcome for your condition.

Prostate Imaging

We get behind Prostate Awareness Month

At least 3000 New Zealand men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year. Since 2015, Mercy Radiology and Prostate Cancer Foundation NZ have collaborated on prostate imaging and treatment research to improve patient outcomes.  

Dr Remy Lim, an expert in prostate gland imaging and cancer diagnosis

Dr Remy Lim specialises in the field of "seeing" prostate cancer with MRI and PSMA PET scans. He has also introduced targeted Lutetium radioligand therapy for Kiwi men with advanced prostate cancer.  

MRI: Improving detection of prostate lesions

Diagnosis of prostate cancer has come a long way since the days of the standard ‘finger test’. If you have an elevated PSA or a strong family history of prostate cancer you may choose to have an MRI scan of your prostate. An MRI scan detects any concerning lesion that will require further work up.

Learn more about MRI here

Our “bionic” approach to diagnose prostate cancer

At Mercy Radiology, we use our "bionic" approach to diagnose and stage prostate cancer. We combine the expertise of our radiologists with the best in imaging technology to make sure you get the best possible care. From MRI, CT, PET scans to groundbreaking treatments like Lutetium radioligand therapy, you can count on us to be there for your journey.

 

An accurate way to detect extent of Prostate Cancer

If you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, our PSMA PET/CT scan can detect any cancer that has spread outside of the prostate gland, with greater accuracy than traditional imaging such as bone scan or CT scan.  

Learn more about PET-CT scans

Palliation of advanced Prostate Cancer

Mercy Radiology is the only centre in NZ to provide Lutetium PSMA radioligand therapy. This novel treatment is suitable for palliation of advanced prostate cancer, whilst maintaining a good quality of life with minimal side effects.

Learn more about Lutetium Therapy

FAQ's

What are the most common prostate symptoms?

Some potential warning signs are trouble in urination. One or more symptoms may include:

  • difficulty starting or stopping urination
  • feeling the need for urination, even though nothing comes out
  • A painful or burning sensation during urination
  • the stream of urination is weak
  • blood in urine

More information regarding prostate cancer management can be found on the Prostate Foundation website here.

How is prostate cancer diagnosed and treated?

If you have an elevated PSA or a strong family history of prostate cancer you can choose to have a MRI scan of your prostate. An MRI scan can detect a concerning lesion. 

If you do get diagnosed with prostate cancer, another form of scan called PSMA PET-CT scan which aims to make sure that the cancer hasn't spread outside of the prostate gland. 

For patients with advanced prostate cancer, a form of palliative treatment called Lutetium PSMA – made available in New Zealand by Mercy Radiology. 

This treatment is safely administered at our facility There are several pathways to treating prostate cancer. To help with making decisions about treatment, patients can be placed into high, intermediate or low risk groups with respect to likely cancer outcome. This is done using a combination of factors and the treatment plan is designed by multi-disciplinary team of specialists and radiologists with the goal of ensuring the best outcome for the patient.

More information regarding prostate cancer management can be found on the Prostate Foundation website here.

How to prevent prostate cancer?

There is no absolute prostate cancer prevention. But diet and making healthy choices may reduce your risk of prostate cancer. Another proactive approach is for men over 50 to have a regular PSA screening test each year, after talking it over with their doctor.

More information regarding prostate cancer management can be found on the Prostate Foundation website here.

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